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under u.s. law. the united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions and it is important to remember that since 9/11, we have used the federal court system to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists. >> nbc news justice correspondent pete williams is live with us right now. i know you've been reviewing these charges. what's the latest on what you've uncovered? >> it is a fairly interesting sequence of things that the government cites here as evidence. first of all they say that there was a surveillance tape that shows what apparently is the second suspect, dzhokhar tsarnaev, the man in the hospital, placing the bomb at the second bombing. this is unrelated picture to what i'm talking about now. but this is the person we're talking about. but the surveillance tape was taken at the scene of the second bombing. you may recall that there was a restaurant there called the foreign restaurant. they say a surveillance camera there shows him walking up to the restaurant with his backpack on. that he takes a cell phone off, seems to be using it for a while, then seems to be
exception under the miranda allowing law enforcement to interview him, making sure there are no other bombs, threats, perpetrators still out there giving the law enforcement flexibility to do the that prior to miranda and i think the court will interpret it broadly and give them the time they need to make sure that the public is safe. after that, he will have to be mirandized, doesn't mean the end of cooperation, but no basis yet to conclude they should be treated at enemy combatants. we're talking about an american citizen on american soil. there's no evidence that i've seen yet that they were a part of an al qaeda cell or directed by a foreign government. we're very far afield from a situation which is sort of the paradigm for enemy combatant status. that is, someone captured on the balg battlefield in a theater of war. resist these charges as an enemy combatant. the court has proven capable of supporting a terrorist constitution and i'm confident the justice department with all the evidence we've seen and a lot more we haven't can build a very strong case. >> congressman, at this point w
through our civilian system of justice. under u.s. law the united states citizens can not be tried in military commissions. and it is important to remember that since 9/11, we have used the federal court system to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists. >> tsarnaev now lies under armed guard unable to speak due to what may be a self-inflicted gunshot wound in his neck. authorities continue to question him, relying on written answers at this point. but his answers may be somewhat less important in his prosecution given the volume of evidence in the federal complaint, including description of video after the first explosion. "bomber two virtually alone among the individuals in front of the restaurant appears calm. he glances to the east and then calmly, but rapidly, begins moving to the west. away from the direction of the finish line. he walks away without his knapsack. having left it on the ground where he'd been standing. approximately ten seconds later, an explosion occurs." the complaint also contains details from the carjacking victim who says one of the suspects said t
as an enemy combatant. we will prosecute this terrorist under u.s. law. united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions. this is absolutely the right way to go and the appropriate way to go. and when it comes to united states citizens, it is against the law to try them in military commissions. >> and it matters that the white house is treating the idea of holding an american citizen outside of the american legal system as what it is, which is crazy and unacceptable. and it matters that appears to be where americans stand on the issue too. when asked just last week in the midst of the aftermath of the boston bombing, with the images and videos of the horror there, the top of everyone's mind, which worries you more, the government will not go far enough to investigate terrorism because of concerns about constitutional rights, or that it will go too far in compromising constitutional rights in order to investigate terrorism. more people answered they are more worried about the government going too far. today is the first day of a big, important test for us as a country. a test of w
jersey governor chris christie wants to make some of the toughest state gun laws in the country even tougher. >>> good morning from fenway park! it's monday, april 22nd, 2013! now here's "the daily rundown" with chuck todd! boston strong! woo! >> what a great way to begin what hopefully is a better week for everybody thanks to the baby giraffes, an improv group from boston. those good morning videos, you could be tomorrow's winner. let's get to my first reads of the morning. let's run through everything we've learned since friday night's arrest. federal prosecutors may file terrorism charges today against dzhokhar tsarnaev, the 19-year-old man accused of the boston marathon bombings. tsarnaev is under guard in serious but stable condition at a boston hospital with a gunshot wound to the neck. some investigators believe that wound may be the result of a suicide attempt before his arrest. he's now being questioned, but only for brief periods because of his medical condition and is responding mostly in writing because of the injury. investigators have been trying to piece together the e
is the federal law version of what a bomb is, if death results, then that is a capital offense. the government could seek the death penalty. massachusetts is a state that does not have the death penalty. so the only death-eligible charge here would be the federal offense, even though four people were killed, the government alleges, the three victims of the. bog and the campus policeman. >> okay. in terms of the investigation, where does that stand now? what are the most prom neinent angles that are being pursued? >> these main questions are really the ones that have been true ever since the discovery of who these two people were. and the directions that they're headed in are really going to be the same here for weeks. so the investigation is not going to be, you know, taking sudden turns. the main questions are how and where did they assemble the components of the bomb. how did they buy them? where did they build them? were there any practices? secondly, what happened when the brother, tamerlan, the older brother who was shot to death thursday night, what happened when he went to russia last y
. >> if people are coming from countries where, perhaps, they grew up under sharia law, i think we can make a safe assumption they have been radicalized. >> lindsey graham was on some show this week saying this shows how we need better tracking. i'm thinking this shows how we need better immigrants. >> how do we give asylum to people from islamic countries, or islamic territories? i would submit people shouldn't be coming here as tourists from check kn chechnya after 9/11. dagestan, chechnya, kyrgyzstan, uh-huh. as george bush would say, none of them stands. >> let me get this right, krystal. asylum is not based on those that may be in desire of leaving countries that we think their policies are no good. asylum is based on who you are. have you ever heard anything more biased and -- and in many ways profiling people just based on their nationality? i mean, it's the exact anti-thesis to what asylum is. >> it's the exact antithesis of everything this country stands for. judging people. not allowing them into this country because of their religion is unbelievable. i would love to know how many
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)